Welcome To The V8 Speed and Resto Shop! Forums V8 Forum V8 Speed and Resto Shop Car Builds 1967 Pontiac GTO Restoration and Performance Upgrades at V8 Speed and Resto

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  • #9002
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    This 1967 Pontiac GTO came to the V8 Speed & Resto Shop in need of a complete restoration, and we’re also going to be making some key performance upgrades along the way.

    #9009
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    This car has an interesting history, one that is all-too-common to many of us. Specifically, the owner bought it in the late 1980s, and promptly had the engine rebuilt with top-shelf stuff. The car was Tyrol Blue with a black interior and black vinyl top. It’s a factory A/C car with a 400 V8 and an automatic.

    The owner drove it for about 1000 miles and parked it in order to dedicate his resources to raise his family. That was in about 1989. Today, the time has come to bring it back to the road!

    This is how the car arrived at the V8 Speed & Resto Shop. It looks rough and rusty, but some of that is brown primer.

    It’s not pretty, and the lower rear quarters have been cut off, but it’s fairly complete.

    Some disassembly has already occurred, and there were some extra parts in the car.

    The mighty 400 looks a bit forlorn, but some pieces appear new… or at least not as old as the rest. Hoses, some wiring, and the alternator seem recent.

    #9095
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    The chassis looked a little scaly, but not “gone”, and the car will need the typical repairs on the body mounts that all these seem to need. The floors appear to need some love as well, as does the trunk floor.

    #9096
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    The front suspension is crusty, but we will be upgrading all this with some tubular parts from BMR Suspension to improve the handling of the old Goat.

    Squishy body mount bushing, and probably rusted hole on the frame.

    Typical lower panel rust.

    #9398
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    The paint on this car looked like it went through a war. It was several different colors, with the constant being rust. The vinyl top had seen better days, but at least the trim was there because that can be very hard to find.

    Note the T3 headlights

    We start the disassembly process by measuring and noting the panel fitment, if the panel was going to be replaced or not. This allows us some reference points as we assemble the car with repaired or replaced sheet metal. We have a feeling that the OPGI delivery truck will be busy with this car.

    #9409
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    A couple things to note in this pic… 1: the vinyl top. These usually mean rusty quarter panels and rust under the window trim. They also mean that the top might have been installed by a “top shop” or accessory installer at some time, making the trim uber hard to find. We’ll see. 2: Cool old stickers in the window. We’re always intrigued by the history of these old cars!

    Rear bumper is bent, tail pan is rusty, lights don’t fit that well… typical old car stuff.

    Original blue showing through rust colored primer and rust.

    Typical GM “A” body wheel tub, trunk drop, and quarter rust.

    #9410
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    More rusty-crusty

    Looks like a quarter panel hole filled with mud, then left in primer to rust even more.

    Interesting shot… original Tyrol blue, then this GTO was red at some point!

    Red in the jambs! Also note factory A/C vent in the dash.

    #9411
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    Factory A/C control in the dash, with vent above sliders.

    Time to start in on this one. The pieces of yellow tape are marked with measurements of how the car fit when it arrived in our shop. All the body panel fitments are measured and recorded for reference and to document how the car fit when it arrived in our shop.

    This one has obvious issues, but they’ll all be fixed as the project progresses.

    #9412
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    After all the inspections and measurements were taken, it was time for our Goat to start shedding!

    The front sheet metal was removed, and the 400 was pulled with the transmission.

    The frame looked crusty on the top side as well…

    Dash coming apart

    Pretty soon the whole shell was gutted of glass, sheet metal, trim, mechanisms, hoses, wiring… you get the idea.

    The chassis was unbolted from the body and rolled out into the sun.

    #9413
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    Original sealer was scraped and removed from the body seams in preparation of the media blasting process.

    The chassis was disassembled as well.

    The body was stripped using a dustless blasting process. Paint was not removed from large flat areas where it is safer and quick to hand-sand with dual-action sanders. Other irregular areas, like body panel joints, trunk floor, and panel edges, are most efficiently stripped by blasting because of their shapes.

    #9414
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    Quarter panel revealed much previous crash damage

    Typical GTO rear window rust

    Lots of daylight in the trunk through rust holes

    Rocker panels were surprisingly clean, but the driver side was bashed.

    Main floor looks OK at a glance, but is actually riddled with rust pinholes.

    Dash shows typical rust for these body style cars

    #9415
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    The frame was stripped and checked for squareness. It was in pretty decent shape, save for the rusty body mounts. Those were all repaired with new steel. HTP Welders provide the burn to melt the steel.

    #9416
    V8 Staff
    Keymaster

    This 2-layer joint rusted through both sections, we had to cut it all out and add clean steel.

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